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Dr. King

War, Peace & Human Need:
Reflecting on the Legacy of Dr. King

Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Duluth
835 College St ~ Duluth

Saturday ~ January 19 ~ 6:00 PM

6:00 pm ~ Soup Supper
6:30 pm ~ Program

The Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Duluth hosted Duluth's Official 2013 MLK Dr Martin Luther King Birthday Celebration event on Saturday Jan 19th.

The program featured:

  • Excerpts of Dr. King's speeches read by students from Denfeld High School
  • A reading by Sue Sojourner from "Thunder of Freedom"
  • Reflections by Brandon Clokey focusing on the MN Arms Spending Alternative Project efforts.

Sponsored by: The MLK Planning Committee of Duluth and The Peace and Justice Committee of UUCD

Special thanks to Scott Greaves of DataCom/OTA for filming and editing of the student speakers and Sue Sojourner. The MLK Holiday committee appreciates his being willing to share his work with the committee and the community.

For more information on this event, contact Scot Bol at 218-269-8096 or earthmannow@gmail.com

A few years ago there was a shining moment in that struggle. It seemed as if there was a real promise of hope for the poor -- both black and white -- through the poverty program. There were experiments, hopes, new beginnings. Then came the buildup in Vietnam and I watched the program broken and eviscerated as if it were some idle political plaything of a society gone mad on war, and I knew that America would never invest the necessary funds or energies in rehabilitation of its poor so long as adventures like Vietnam continued to draw men and skills and money like some demonic destructive suction tube. So I was increasingly compelled to see the war as an enemy of the poor and to attack it as such.

And some of us who have already begun to break the silence of the night have found that the calling to speak is often a vocation of agony, but we must speak. We must speak with all the humility that is appropriate to our limited vision, but we must speak. And we must rejoice as well, for surely this is the first time in our nation's history that a significant number of its religious leaders have chosen to move beyond the prophesying of smooth patriotism to the high grounds of a firm dissent based upon the mandates of conscience and the reading of history. Perhaps a new spirit is rising among us. If it is, let us trace its movements and pray that our own inner being may be sensitive to its guidance, for we are deeply in need of a new way beyond the darkness that seems so close around us.

~~ Martin Luther King, Jr. from Beyond Vietnam: A Time to Break Silence